best medication for anxiety and depression 2017

Best Medication for Anxiety and Depression

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Best medication for anxiety and depression are a popular alternative to anxiety medications. But there are also thousands of them, as nearly every major natural medicine company seems to have developed their own product for the anxiety market. There are two problems here. First, studies have rarely found any benefits to most natural anxiety medicines (more on that in a moment). Second, with so many products on the market, it is hard to know which best supplements for anxiety are likely to work, and which ones aren’t.

what is the best medication for anxiety and depressionSupplements aren’t meant to replace prescribed medication or other doctor-approved therapies. But they can be helpful additions to your care plan. Although the supplements below are generally tolerated well, it’s important to understand how they may affect you specifically. Age, upcoming surgery, pregnancy, or other underlying health conditions can all affect your individual dosage. Some supplements are dangerous when taken in higher than recommended doses.

You should always check with your doctor before adding supplements to your routine. They can discuss any potential side effects or drug interactions with you. It’s also important to note that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration doesn’t regulate or monitor supplements like they do for drugs. You should only buy from manufacturers you trust, as well as follows any dosage information to a T. Read on to learn how vitamins, herbs, and other supplements may help reduce feelings of anxiety and promote overall well-being.

Most Common Best Medication For Anxiety And Depression

best medications for social anxiety and depressionThe following represent the most common types of anti-anxiety supplements, including information on the likelihood that they have any effect and whether they are worth considering. Always talk with your doctor before taking any type of supplement.

Vitamin Supplements and Mineral Supplements

Vitamins and minerals are also a very popular choice for anxiety. We’re still dealing with a surprising lack of research. Despite all the research into vitamins and minerals, very few studies have been conducted on the benefits of supplements on anxiety levels. While many studies have confirmed that a lack of these vitamins may cause anxiety, it is unclear whether a specific vitamin can have anti-anxiety effects. Nevertheless, vitamin supplementation can be very healthy regardless, so it is worth trying with most types of vitamins and minerals.

The most common include:

best medication for anxiety and depression 2018If you’re already eating a balanced diet, this type of supplementation may not be necessary. But if you know your diet is lacking key nutrients, dietary supplements may be the key to symptom relief. Although dietary best supplements for anxiety aren’t a replacement for the food itself, they can help you get the nutrients you need while you get your diet back on track. Your doctor can also help you identify or confirm any deficiencies, as well as offer information on dosage and overall dietary health.

1. Vitamin A

People with anxiety sometimes lack vitamin A. Vitamin A is an antioxidant that’s been shown to help manage anxiety symptoms.
How to use: The average supplement dose is around 10,000 international units (IU), taken as a once-daily tablet.

2. B-complex

B-complex supplements contain all the B vitamins that your body needs. Many are vital to a healthy nervous system. They may also help improve symptoms of anxiety and depression.
How to use: Label dosages for B-complexes containing all B vitamins may vary. On average, dosages range from 300 milligrams (mg) to close to 500 mg. Either dose may be taken as one tablet per day.

3. Vitamin C

Antioxidants like vitamin C can help prevent oxidative damage in your nervous system. Oxidative damage can increase anxiety.
How to use: The average supplement dose ranges from 500 to 1000 mg. This may be split across two tablets or taken as a once-daily tablet.

4. Vitamin D

Vitamin D is an important nutrient that helps the body absorb other vitamins. Vitamin D deficiency can lead to other vitamin deficiencies, which may compound anxiety and make it worse.
How to use: The average supplement dose may range from 1,000 to 2,000 IU. Either dose may be split across multiple tablets or taken as a once-daily tablet.

5. Vitamin E

Vitamin E is another antioxidant. Your body uses this nutrient up quickly in times of stress and anxiety. Supplemental vitamin E may help restore this balance and reduce your symptoms.
How to use: The average supplement dose is around 400 IU, taken as a once-daily tablet.

6. Fish oil

Fish oil is high in omega-3 fatty acids, which are antioxidants. Omega-3 supplements like EPA and DHA have been shown to help reduce anxiety.
How to use: The average supplement dose may contain up to 2,000 mg of combined EPA, ALA, and DHA. Each dose may be split across multiple tablets or taken as a once-daily tablet.

7. GABA

Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GAMMA) is an amino acid and neurotransmitter in the brain.
When there’s not enough GABA, anxiety can worsen. According to a 2015 review, supplements with GABA may help replace lost GABA, though more research is needed.
How to use: The average supplement dose can range from 500 to 750 mg. Either dose may be split across multiple tablets or taken as a once-daily tablet.

8. L-theanine

L-theanine is an amino acid. It’s a soothing property found in green tea.
A 2018 study showed it had anti anxiety benefits in rats. A 2011 human study vouched for It’s calming benefits, too.
How to use: The average supplement dose is around 200 mg. This is usually taken as a once-daily tablet.

9. Magnesium

Magnesium is a necessary mineral for human health. Your body doesn’t need too much of it. But if you aren’t getting enough, magnesium deficiency may lead to anxiety symptoms.
How to use: The average supplement dose may range from 100 to 500 mg. Either dose may be taken as a once-daily tablet.

10. 5-HTP

5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) is a neurotransmitter. It’s a precursor to serotonin. That’s the “happiness neurotransmitter” in the human brain.

A 2012 study found that 5-HTP supplements may help with anxiety. However, these are most effective only when used in certain therapies, and by recommendation from your doctor.

How to use: The average best medication for anxiety and depression dose may range from 50 to 200 mg. Either dose may be taken as a once-daily capsule.

Tension {Headache Medicine : Drugs for Migraine and Headache Pain

Articles OnMigraine & Headache Medicines - Medications |} {for Migraine and Headache Pain
Pain Relievers are typically the primary drugs recommended by doctors for migraine and headaches. A number of these medicines are over-the-counter, or available without a doctor's prescription, though other headache medications require a prescription. When taking these headache drugs, avoid products that contain caffeine. Any medication containing barbiturates or narcotics should be used sparingly.
Note: if Symptomatic relief medications are used more than twice every week, you should see Your doctor, who may prescribe preventive headache drugs. Overuse of Symptomatic drugs can actually cause more frequent headaches or worsen headache symptoms.Drugs for relief of migraine or headache symptoms include:
Generic Name Brand Name Use Precautions Possible Side Effects
Acetaminophen
Tylenol
Pain relief Few side effects if taken as directed, although they may include: changes in blood counts and liver damage
Aspirin
Bayer, Bufferin, Ecotrin
Pain relief Do not use in children younger than age 14 years due to the potential for Reye's syndrome (a life-threatening neurological condition) Heartburn, gastrointestinal bleeding, bronchospasm or constriction that causes narrowing of the airways, anaphylaxis (life-threatening allergic reaction), ulcers

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Fenoprofen
Nalfon
Prevention of tension headaches; migraines; hormone headaches Nausea, diarrhea, indigestion, dizziness, drowsiness
Flurbiprofen
Ansaid
Prevention of tension headaches; migraines. Treatment of tension headache; migraines
Gastrointestinal upset, drowsiness, dizziness, vision problems, ulcers

Ibuprofen
Advil, Motrin IB, Nuprin
Treatment of tension headache; migraines
Gastrointestinal upset, gastrointestinal bleeding, nausea, vomiting, rash, liver damage

Ketoprofen Actron
Prevention of tension headaches; migraines. Treatment of migraines Gastrointestinal upset, gastrointestinal bleeding, nausea, vomiting, rash, liver damage

Nabumetone
Relafen
Prevention of tension headaches; migraines Constipation, heartburn, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting
Naproxen
Aleve
Prevention of tension headaches; hormone headaches. Treatment of migraines Gastrointestinal upset, gastrointestinal bleeding, nausea, vomiting, rash, liver damage
Diclofenac
Cataflam
Treatment of tension headache; migraines Stomach upset, bloating, dizziness, drowsiness, loss of appetite
Ketorolac
Toradol
Treatment of tension headache
Gastrointestinal upset, drowsiness, dizziness, vision problems, ulcers

Meclofenate Meclomen
Treatment of tension headache Nausea, diarrhea, indigestion, dizziness, drowsiness
Carisoprodol
Soma
Treatment of tension headache Dizziness, drowsiness, nausea, headache, nervousness, skin rash, bleeding
Orphenadrine citrate Norflex
Treatment of tension headache Drowsiness, dizziness, headache, nervousness, blurred vision

Methocarbamol
Robaxin
Treatment of tension headache Dizziness, drowsiness, nausea, darkening of urine
Cyclobenzaprine HCL Flexeril
Treatment of tension headache Dry mouth, drowsiness, dizziness
Metaxalone
Skelaxin
Treatment of tension headache Drowsiness, dizziness, headache, nervousness

Strategies for Using Over-the-Counter Headache Pain Relievers

{

Over-the-counter pain relievers have been proven to be safe when used |} as directed. But keep these precautions in mind:

Know the active ingredients in each product. Be sure to read the whole label. {
Do not exceed the recommended dosage on the package. |}
Carefully consider the best way to use pain relievers and all drugs. It's simple to over-medicate yourself. {
Check with your doctor before taking products containing aspirin, aspirin, or naproxen should: you have a bleeding problem; asthma; recently had surgery or dental operation or are going to have surgery; have ulcers, kidney or liver disorders; or take some other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). |}
Check with your health care provider before taking acetaminophen if you have kidney or liver issues. How to Treat a Tension Headache

First, check that it is in fact a pressure headache. Normally it causes Tightness or pressure in a band-like place around your brow and mind. The pain won't be extreme, either.

Medicine, anxiety relief, and keeping up a healthy lifestyle are some of the Best approaches to cure and prevent your stress headaches.

Medicines

You may often find relief on your own without seeing a doctor. Try out these Over-the-counter (OTC) painkillers:

Acetaminophen
Aspirin
Ibuprofen
Naproxen |}

Medicines that unite acetaminophen, aspirin, and caffeine can also be helpful.

Studies show aspirin to be the OTC medication that works best for relieving Pain, and they show that aspirin works much better than acetaminophen. Speak with your doctor about what is best for you.

No matter which Kind of over-the-counter pain relief you require, it is If you take too much medication, it may result in"rebound" or"medication overuse" headaches. It can also cause issues with your liver, kidneys, stomach, and other organs.

If OTC choices don't make your pain go away, your doctor may try

Sometimes, neither of these eliminates pain. At that point, your Physician Might move on to something stronger, says Mark W. Green, MD, director of the Mount Sinai Center for Headache and Pain Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine in New York. |}

Could You Quit a Tension Headache Without Medicine?

These drug-free methods are not quick fixes because you will need to learn how To use them. However, you might want to consider them for the future.

Biofeedback. This process uses an electronic equipment to Measure how well your body relaxes. It is a way to train yourself to alleviate a pressure headache.

Cognitive behavioral therapy. identify |} Ideas and beliefs that cause you anxiety, which may trigger a headache.

Some people today use acupuncture, massage, and acupuncture, also.

"The treatments with the most science supporting them are cognitive "Those would be the ones with the highest levels of proof to support them"

Stop Your Headache Before It Starts

The best way to deal with tension headaches is to keep them from happening In the first location. Try to determine what sets off your pain, and function to avoid these triggers. {Some common ones include:

Anxiety
Bad posture
insufficient sleep
Unhealthy eating habits
Smoking |}

"Stress reduction can Decrease tension headache episodes, as can good Posture, diet, and exercise," Green says. |} "People who sit at a computer all day don't move their neck. That is a trigger."

If your anxiety headaches happen more than four times a month, your Physician May imply that you take medicine to stop them. {These can include:

|}

Antidepressants for example:

{

Amitriptyline (Elavil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and venlafaxine (Effexor)

|}

Anti-seizure medications such as:

{

Topiramate (Topamax)
Gabapentin (Neurontin)

Tension Headache Diagnosis |}

If You've Got recurrent or chronic headaches, your doctor may conduct physical And neurological tests, then attempt to pinpoint the type and cause of your headaches utilizing these strategies:

Your pain description

Your doctor can learn a lot about your headaches in the description of your pain. {Be sure to include these details:

Pain characteristics. |} Does your pain pulsate? Or is it constant and dull? Sharp or stabbing?
Stress intensity. A fantastic index of the severity of your aggravation is how much you are able to function as you've got it. Are you able to work? Can your headaches wake you or prevent you from sleeping?
Pain location. Can you feel pain throughout your mind, on only 1 side of your mind, or simply on your forehead or behind your eyes?
Imaging tests

If You've Got unusual or complicated headaches, your doctor may order tests to Rule out serious causes of head pain, such as a tumor. Two common tests used to image your brain include:

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). |} An MRI scanning combines a magnetic field, radio waves and computer technology to create clear images. {
Computerized tomography (CT).
|} A CT scan is a diagnostic imaging procedure that uses a run of computer-directed X-rays to provide a comprehensive view of your brain. Therapy

Some people with tension headaches don't seek medical care and attempt to Care for the pain on their own. Unfortunately, repeated usage of over-the-counter drugs (OTC) pain relievers may actually cause another kind of aggravation, overuse headaches.

Intense drugs

A variety of drugs, both OTC and prescription, can be found to reduce The pain of a headache, such as:

• Straightforward OTC pain relievers are usually the first line of treatment for reducing pain. These include the medications aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) and naproxen (Aleve). |}

Prescription drugs include naproxen (Naprosyn), indomethacin (Indocin) and ketorolac (Ketorolac Tromethamine).

Combination drugs. Aspirin or acetaminophen or both are often combined with caffeine or a sedative medication in one medication. Combination drugs might be more effective than are single-ingredient pain relievers. Many combination drugs are available OTC. {
Triptans and narcotics.
|} For people who experience both migraines and episodic tension headaches, a triptan can effectively relieve the pain of both headaches. Opiates, or narcotics, are seldom used due to their side effects and potential for dependence. {
Preventive medications
|}

Your doctor may prescribe drugs to Decrease the frequency and seriousness Of strikes, particularly if you've got chronic or frequent headaches that are not relieved by pain medication and other therapies.

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Preventive medications may include:

{

Tricyclic antidepressants.

|} Tricyclic antidepressants, such as amitriptyline and protriptyline, are the most commonly used drugs to avoid tension headaches. Side effects of the medications may include nausea, constipation and dry mouth. {
Other antidepressants.
|} Additionally, there is some evidence to support using these antidepressants venlafaxine (Effexor XR) and mirtazapine (Remeron). |} {
Anticonvulsants and muscle relaxants.
|} { Other medications that can prevent tension headaches include anticonvulsants, such as topiramate (Topamax). |} More research is necessary.

Preventive medications may need a few weeks or longer to build up on your So don't get frustrated if you have not seen improvements soon after you start taking the medication.

{

Your doctor will monitor your treatment to see how the preventive medication |} is working. In the meantime, overuse of pain relievers to your headaches might interfere with the effects of the preventive drugs.

Ask an {Appointment at Mayo Clinic

Clinical trials |}

Explore Mayo Clinic research testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a way to prevent, detect, cure or manage this disease. {

Lifestyle and home remedies |}

Rest, ice packs or a long, hot shower could be all you need to relieve a tension headache. A number of strategies can help reduce the severity and frequency of chronic stress headaches without using medicine. Try out a few of the following:

Manage your anxiety level. One way to help decrease anxiety is by going ahead and coordinating daily. Another way is to allow more time to unwind. And if you are caught in a stressful situation, look at stepping back.
Move cold or hot. Applying ice or heat -- whatever you want -- to sore muscles can ease a pressure headache. For warmth, use a heating pad set on low, a hot-water jar, a hot compress or a hot towel. A spa or shower can also help. For cold, wrap ice, an ice pack or frozen vegetables in a cloth to protect your skin.
Perfect your position. Good posture can help keep your muscles from tensing. When standing, hold back your shoulders and your mind level. Pull on your stomach and buttocks. When sitting, ensure that your legs are parallel to the floor and your mind isn't slumped forward. Alternative medicine

The next nontraditional therapies may help if you have anxiety headache Anxiety:

Acupuncture. |} Acupuncture may provide temporary relief from chronic headache pain. Acupuncture professionals treat you using exceptionally thin, disposable needles that normally cause little pain or distress. The American Academy of Medical Acupuncture site provides referrals to medical doctors who use acupuncture in their practices. {
Massage.
|} Massage can help reduce tension and relieve stress. It is particularly effective for relieving tight, tender muscles in the back of your head, neck and shoulders. For many people, it might also provide relief from headache pain.
Deep breathing, biofeedback and behavior therapies. A variety of relaxation therapies are useful in coping with anxiety headaches, such as deep breathing and biofeedback. Dealing and encourage

Living with chronic pain can be difficult. |} Persistent pain can make you stressed Or depressed and affect your relationships, your productivity and the quality of your life.

Here are some hints:

Talk to a therapist or counselor. Chat treatment might help you deal with the effects of chronic pain. {
Join a support team. |} Support classes can be good sources of information. Group members often know about the newest treatments. Your doctor might have the ability to recommend a group in your region.

Considering taking drugs to treat Tension Headache? Below is a listing of common medications used to treat or decrease the signs of Tension Headache. Follow the links to read shared applications, side effects, dose details and read user testimonials for the drugs listed below.

Your hunt for Tension Headache returned the subsequent treatments.

Tips for Using Over-the-Counter Headache Pain Relievers
Over-the-counter pain relievers have been demonstrated to be safe when used as directed. But keep the following precautions in mind:
• Know the active ingredients in each product. Be sure to read the entire label.
• Do not exceed the recommended dosage on the package.
• Carefully consider how you use pain relievers and all medications. It is easy to over-medicate yourself.
• Check with your doctor before taking products containing aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen if: you have a bleeding problem; asthma; recently had surgery or dental surgery or are about to have surgery; have ulcers, kidney or liver disorders; or take any other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs).
• Check with your doctor before taking acetaminophen if you have kidney or liver problems.

How to Treat a Tension Headache
First, check that it really is a tension headache. Usually it causes tightness or pressure in a band-like area around your forehead and head. The pain won't be intense, either.
Medicine, stress relief, and keeping up a healthy lifestyle are some of the best ways to treat and prevent your tension headaches.
Medicines
You can often find relief on your own without seeing a doctor. Try these over-the-counter (OTC) painkillers:
• Acetaminophen
• Aspirin
• Ibuprofen
• Naproxen
Medicines that combine acetaminophen, aspirin, and caffeine are also helpful.
Studies show aspirin to be the OTC medication that works best for relieving pain, and they show that ibuprofen works better than acetaminophen. Talk to your doctor about what's best for you.
No matter which type of over-the-counter pain relief you take, it's important to use only the recommended amount. If you take too much medication, it can lead to "rebound" or "medication overuse" headaches. It can also cause problems with your liver, kidneys, stomach, and other organs.
If OTC options don't make your pain go away, your doctor might try prescription-strength pain relievers.
Sometimes, neither of these gets rid of pain. At that point, your doctor might move on to something stronger, says Mark W. Green, MD, director of the Mount Sinai Center for Headache and Pain Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine in New York.
Can You Stop a Tension Headache Without Medicine?
These drug-free methods aren't quick fixes because you'll need to learn how to use them. But you may want to consider them for the future.
Biofeedback. This process uses an electronic machine to measure how well your body relaxes. It's a way to train yourself to ease a tension headache.
Cognitive behavioral therapy. A therapist helps you to spot thoughts and beliefs that cause you stress, which can trigger a headache.
Some people use massage, chiropractic, and acupuncture, too.
"The treatments with the most science behind them are cognitive behavioral therapy and biofeedback," Green says. "Those are the ones with the highest levels of evidence to support them."
Stop Your Headache Before It Starts
The best way to deal with tension headaches is to keep them from happening in the first place. Try to figure out what sets off your pain, and work to avoid these triggers. Some common ones include:
• Stress
• Bad posture
• Not enough sleep
• Unhealthy eating habits
• Smoking
"Stress reduction can reduce tension headache episodes, as can good posture, diet, and exercise," Green says. "People who sit at a computer all day long don't move their neck. That can be a trigger."
If your tension headaches happen more than four times a month, your doctor may suggest that you take medicine to prevent them. These can include:
Antidepressants such as:
• Amitriptyline (Elavil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and venlafaxine (Effexor)
Anti-seizure drugs such as:
• Topiramate (Topamax)
• Gabapentin (Neurontin)
Tension Headache
Diagnosis
If you have chronic or recurrent headaches, your doctor may conduct physical and neurological exams, then try to pinpoint the type and cause of your headaches using these approaches:
Your pain description
Your doctor can learn a lot about your headaches from a description of your pain. Be sure to include these details:
• Pain characteristics. Does your pain pulsate? Or is it constant and dull? Sharp or stabbing?
• Pain intensity. A good indicator of the severity of your headache is how much you're able to function while you have it. Are you able to work? Do your headaches wake you or prevent you from sleeping?
• Pain location. Do you feel pain all over your head, on only one side of your head, or just on your forehead or behind your eyes?
Imaging tests
If you have unusual or complicated headaches, your doctor may order tests to rule out serious causes of head pain, such as a tumor. Two common tests used to image your brain include:
• Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An MRI scan combines a magnetic field, radio waves and computer technology to produce clear images.
• Computerized tomography (CT). A CT scan is a diagnostic imaging procedure that uses a series of computer-directed X-rays to provide a comprehensive view of your brain.
Treatment
Some people with tension headaches don't seek medical attention and try to treat the pain on their own. Unfortunately, repeated use of over-the-counter (OTC) pain relievers can actually cause another type of headache, overuse headaches.
Acute medications
A variety of medications, both OTC and prescription, are available to reduce the pain of a headache, including:
• Pain relievers. Simple OTC pain relievers are usually the first line of treatment for reducing headache pain. These include the drugs aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) and naproxen (Aleve).
Prescription medications include naproxen (Naprosyn), indomethacin (Indocin) and ketorolac (Ketorolac Tromethamine).
• Combination medications. Aspirin or acetaminophen or both are often combined with caffeine or a sedative drug in a single medication. Combination drugs may be more effective than are single-ingredient pain relievers. Many combination drugs are available OTC.
• Triptans and narcotics. For people who experience both migraines and episodic tension headaches, a triptan can effectively relieve the pain of both headaches. Opiates, or narcotics, are rarely used because of their side effects and potential for dependency.
Preventive medications
Your doctor may prescribe medications to reduce the frequency and severity of attacks, especially if you have frequent or chronic headaches that aren't relieved by pain medication and other therapies.
Preventive medications may include:
• Tricyclic antidepressants. Tricyclic antidepressants, including amitriptyline and protriptyline, are the most commonly used medications to prevent tension headaches. Side effects of these medications may include constipation, drowsiness and dry mouth.
• Other antidepressants. There also is some evidence to support the use of the antidepressants venlafaxine (Effexor XR) and mirtazapine (Remeron).
• Anticonvulsants and muscle relaxants. Other medications that may prevent tension headaches include anticonvulsants, such as topiramate (Topamax). More study is needed.
Preventive medications may require several weeks or more to build up in your system before they take effect. So don't get frustrated if you haven't seen improvements shortly after you begin taking the drug.
Your doctor will monitor your treatment to see how the preventive medication is working. In the meantime, overuse of pain relievers for your headaches may interfere with the effects of the preventive drugs.
Request an Appointment at Mayo Clinic
Clinical trials
Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this disease.
Lifestyle and home remedies
Rest, ice packs or a long, hot shower may be all you need to relieve a tension headache. A variety of strategies can help reduce the severity and frequency of chronic tension headaches without using medicine. Try some of the following:
• Manage your stress level. One way to help reduce stress is by planning ahead and organizing your day. Another way is to allow more time to relax. And if you're caught in a stressful situation, consider stepping back.
• Go hot or cold. Applying heat or ice — whichever you prefer — to sore muscles may ease a tension headache. For heat, use a heating pad set on low, a hot-water bottle, a warm compress or a hot towel. A hot bath or shower also may help. For cold, wrap ice, an ice pack or frozen vegetables in a cloth to protect your skin.
• Perfect your posture. Good posture can help keep your muscles from tensing. When standing, hold your shoulders back and your head level. Pull in your abdomen and buttocks. When sitting, make sure your thighs are parallel to the ground and your head isn't slumped forward.
Alternative medicine
The following nontraditional therapies may help if you have tension headache pain:
• Acupuncture. Acupuncture may provide temporary relief from chronic headache pain. Acupuncture practitioners treat you using extremely thin, disposable needles that generally cause little pain or discomfort. The American Academy of Medical Acupuncture website provides referrals to medical doctors who use acupuncture in their practices.
• Massage. Massage can help reduce stress and relieve tension. It's especially effective for relieving tight, tender muscles in the back of your head, neck and shoulders. For some people, it may also provide relief from headache pain.
• Deep breathing, biofeedback and behavior therapies. A variety of relaxation therapies are useful in coping with tension headaches, including deep breathing and biofeedback.
Coping and support
Living with chronic pain can be difficult. Chronic pain can make you anxious or depressed and affect your relationships, your productivity and the quality of your life.
Here are some suggestions:
• Talk to a counselor or therapist. Talk therapy may help you cope with the effects of chronic pain.
• Join a support group. Support groups can be good sources of information. Group members often know about the latest treatments. Your doctor may be able to recommend a group in your area.
Drugs & Medications Search
Considering taking medication to treat Tension Headache? Below is a list of common medications used to treat or reduce the symptoms of Tension Headache. Follow the links to read common uses, side effects, dosage details and read user reviews for the drugs listed below.
Your search for Tension Headache returned the following treatments.
Drug Name
Indication Type
User Reviews

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Fioricet oral
409 User Reviews

butalbital-acetaminophen-caffeine oral
233 User Reviews

Fiorinal oral
84 User Reviews

Fiorinal-Codeine #3 oral
60 User Reviews

Fioricet with Codeine oral
46 User Reviews

Bupap oral
45 User Reviews

Prodrin oral
42 User Reviews

butalbital-aspirin-caffeine oral
41 User Reviews

isometheptene-dichloralphenazone-acetaminophen oral
40 User Reviews

Esgic oral
25 User Reviews

butalbital-acetaminophen-caffeine-codeine oral
15 User Reviews

butalbital-acetaminophen oral
14 User Reviews

Zebutal oral
13 User Reviews

Butalbital Compound with Codeine oral
12 User Reviews

codeine-butalbital-ASA-caffeine oral
11 User Reviews

chlordiazepoxide HCl oral
10 User Reviews

Nodolor oral
5 User Reviews

Butalbital Compound-Codeine oral
5 User Reviews

Ascomp with Codeine oral
5 User Reviews

isometheptene-caffeine-acetaminophen oral
4 User Reviews

Tencon oral
4 User Reviews

Vanatol LQ oral
2 User Reviews

Margesic oral
1 User Reviews

Marten-Tab oral
Be the first to review it

Capacet oral
Be the first to review it

Allzital oral
Be the first to review it